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ImaRx Therapeutics Inc.

This article was originally published in Start Up

Executive Summary

ImaRx Therapeutics Inc. aims to use a diagnostic contrast agent as a vehicle for drug and gene delivery. The company will encapsulate a therapeutic payload in a synthetic microbubble, inject it into the body, then apply ultrasound across the skin to rupture the microbubble at the targeted site. Shockwaves from the rupture are thought to permeate capillary walls and drive the drug or gene instantaneously into the targeted tissue.

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