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Genentech and Inotek Pair Up in PARP Inhibition

This article was originally published in Start Up

Executive Summary

For the first time, oncology drug development is being grounded in the ability to take advantage of a readily identifiable genetic flaw in certain types of tumor cells. Research reveals that tumor cells containing the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene variants are exquisitely sensitive to attack by inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, or PARP. Now comes a deal between PARP specialist Inotek Pharmaceuticals and Genentech.

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