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Roberts Mitani: An Alternative Strategy for Life Science Investing

This article was originally published in Start Up

Executive Summary

At a time when bankers and investors, driven by quarter-to-quarter results, are always on the look-out for the next deal, Roberts Mitani has a different philosophy for investing in life sciences. "Our firm is built on developing long-term relationships with clients," says principal Bruce Roberts. "Building long-term relationships with clients allows us to be creative; for example, we can work on smaller transactions if that's what the client needs, because we receive warrants for our participation, and, unlike other banks, we know we'll be sticking around to witness the benefits of that kind of deal." The firm is also able to integrate both US and overseas investors.

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