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Skin Repair

This article was originally published in Start Up

Executive Summary

A handful of start-ups hopes to fill the cracks in the fragmented market for skin repair. Their approaches vary widely; British start-up Renovo has a pharmaceutical approach to the prevention of scarring. Reconstructive Technologies believes that the best replacement for skin is skin itself; it has developed a bioreactor that accelerates the growth of autograft skin, with both {in vivo} and {in vitro} systems. Artecel Sciences will use adipose-derived stromal cells in cosmesis and hematopoietic support. Niadyne 's platform of unique formulations of niacin lend themselves to a variety of applications, in cosmeceuticals and in cardiovascular disease.

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Advanced Wound Care: The Device Industry's New Billion Dollar Product Market

For some time now, investors have hated wound care. They've been scarred by past failures, most famously, the simultaneous bankruptcies in 2002 of Advanced Tissue Sciences and Organogenesis, two tissue-engineering companies targeting chronic wounds. "Show me one success," VCs tell start-ups seeking funding. Well, now there is one. Kinetic Concepts is pulling in a billion dollars in revenues from a single product in the advanced wound care market. Is it time for VCs to love advanced wound care? Five new device start-ups hope so. Three are developing therapeutic devices for chronic wounds and two are beginning in acute wound care, an emerging surgical market. (This article also appeared as "Wound Care: Medtech's New Billion Dollar Product Market," Medtech Insight November/December 2007)

Wound Care: Medtech's New Billion Dollar Product Market

For some time now, investors have hated wound care. They've been scarred by past failures, most famously, the simultaneous bankruptcies in 2002 of Advanced Tissue Sciences and Organogenesis, two tissue-engineering companies targeting chronic wounds. "Show me one success," VCs tell start-ups seeking funding. Well, now there is one. Kinetic Concepts is pulling in a billion dollars in revenues from a single product in the advanced wound care market. Is it time for VCs to love advanced wound care? Five new device start-ups hope so. Three are developing therapeutic devices for chronic wounds and two are beginning in acute wound care, an emerging surgical market. (A Reprint of "Advanced Wound Care: The Device Industry's Billion Dollar Product Market," appearing in START-UP, November 2007.

Niadyne Inc.

Niadyne Inc.'s scientific founders have devoted their academic careers to the biological causes of skin cell injury and methods for its repair. The company has developed nutrient-based compounds to combat the DNA damage that leads to deterioration in skin's appearance, as well as a topical system to deliver them. Niadyne's initial products will be marketed as cosmeceuticals, but it aims to pursue longer-term therapeutic interests in wound healing and heart disease.

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