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Case Study: Eisai Partners With Swedish Startup BioArctic In Search Of Cure For Alzheimer’s Disease (Part 2 Of 2)

This article was originally published in PharmAsia News

Executive Summary

Eisai has taken an aggressive approach in seeking out the right partners to fill out its pipelines. The company's partnership with Swedish startup BioArctic to develop a drug for Alzheimer's disease is no exception. Eisai and BioArctic discussed the beginnings of their partnership in the first part of this case study (PharmAsia News, Aug. 6, 2008). This second section discusses in greater detail why the companies view the partnership as a success and what each has brought to the other.

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