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Japanese Researcher And American Team Finds Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Altered Alzheimer’s Disease

This article was originally published in PharmAsia News

Executive Summary

Japan's Saitama Medical Center researcher Takashi Mori and a University of South Florida team found that infusing human umbilical cord blood cells into mice altered Alzheimer's disease-like pathology. Alzheimer's disease is caused by irregular accumulation of beta-amyloid, resulting in nerve cell death. Currently, AD drug development worldwide aims to inhibit the accumulation of beta-amyloid. The research team found that after infusing low-dose human umbilical cord blood cells into 10 mice born with a tendency for easy beta-amyloid accumulation, within two to four weeks, beta-amyloid levels were reduced by around 70 percent compared to control. (Click here for more - Japanese language

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