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Post-Provigil Cephalon aims to realise pipeline dreams and branded generics

This article was originally published in Scrip

Executive Summary

Cephalon CEO Kevin Buchi exuded optimism for the company’s central nervous system business this year as he announced 2010 results on 10 February. Mr Buchi, named to the top job on December 23 after five months filling the role in an acting capacity during the final illness of company founder Dr Frank Baldino, updated the company’s overall guidance on expected total sales in 2011 to the $3.015-3.095 billion range -- $8.70 to $9. a share. That is up from the $2.96-3.04 billion expectation announced in October.

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